C.S. Lewis Chivalry Essay

C.S. Lewis Chivalry Essay-63
Will its ethos be a synthesis of what was best in all the classes, or a mere “pool” with the sediment of all and the virtues of none?

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“I am a democrat [proponent of democracy] because I believe in the Fall of Man. The real reason for democracy is: Mankind is so fallen that no man can be trusted with unchecked power over his fellows.

I think most people are democrats for the opposite reason. I find that they’re not true without looking further than myself. Aristotle said that some people were only fit to be slaves. But I reject slavery because I see no men fit to be masters.” ― “When equality is treated not as a medicine or a safety-gadget but as an ideal we begin to breed that stunted and envious sort of mind which hates all superiority.

This model encourages us to live in Christ as examples of godly men.

in an effort to learn how we can motivate our sons to live lives of honor and nobility. Lewis wrote that the disparate strands of manhood– fierceness and gentleness–can find healthy synthesis in the person of the knight and in the code of chivalry.

The danger of defending democracy on those grounds is that they’re not true. I don’t deserve a share in governing a hen-roost, much less a nation.

For spiritual nature, like bodily nature, will be served; deny it food and it will gobble poison.” ― “A great deal of democratic enthusiasm descends from the ideas of people like Rousseau, who believed in democracy because they thought mankind so wise and good that everyone deserved a share in the government. I find that they’re not true without looking further than myself.It demanded valour of the urbane and modest man because everyone knew that he was as likely as not to be a milksop.” ― “Mankind is so fallen that no man can be trusted with unchecked power over his fellows.Aristotle said that some people were only fit to be slaves. But I reject slavery because I see no men fit to be masters.” ― “Nothing would induce me to return to the age of fourteen: but neither would anything induce me to forgo the exquisite Proustian or Wordsworthian moments in which that part of the past sometimes returns to me.” ― “In tire world today there is a “liberal” or “enlightened” tradition which regards the combative side of man’s nature as a pure, atavistic evil, and scouts the chivalrous sentiment as part of the “false glamour” of war.Aristotle said that some people were only fit to be slaves. But I reject slavery because I see no men fit to be masters.” ― “My theme is chivalry.I have tried to show that this old tradition is practical and vital.The ideal embodied in Launcelot is “escapism” in a sense never dreamed of by those who use that word; it offers the only possible escape from a world divided between wolves who do not understand, and sheep who cannot defend, the things which make life desirable.There was, to be sure, a rumour in the last century that wolves would gradually become extinct by some natural process; but this seems to have been an exaggeration.” ― “The medieval ideal brought together two things which have no natural tendency to gravitate towards one another. It taught humility and forbearance to the great warrior because everyone knew by experience how much he usually needed that lesson.The ideal embodied in Launcelot is ‘escapism’ in a sense never dreamed of by those who use that word; it offers the only possible escape from a world divided between wolves who do not understand, and sheep who cannot defend, the things which make life desirable.” ― “The knight is a man of blood and iron, a man familiar with the sight of smashed faces and the ragged stumps of lopped-off limbs; he is also a demure, almost a maidenlike, guest in hall, a gentle, modest, unobtrusive man.He is not a compromise or happy mean between ferocity and meekness; he is fierce to the nth and meek to the nth.Already in our own Kipling the heroic qualities of his favourite subalterns are dangerously removed from meekness and urbanity.One cannot quite imagine the adult Stalkey in the same room with the best of Nelson’s captains, still less with Sidney!

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