Creative Writing Prompts Elementary

Creative Writing Prompts Elementary-37
‘The testing culture in schools has led children to think that there is always one answer to aim for, but in creative writing, there is no right or wrong,’ says Julia.‘We need to build children’s confidence to write about whatever they’re seeing or thinking, and prompts are a great way to encourage this.’It’s also essential to let your child write freely when they’re using a writing prompt, without getting too caught up in spelling, punctuation and grammar.

‘The testing culture in schools has led children to think that there is always one answer to aim for, but in creative writing, there is no right or wrong,’ says Julia.‘We need to build children’s confidence to write about whatever they’re seeing or thinking, and prompts are a great way to encourage this.’It’s also essential to let your child write freely when they’re using a writing prompt, without getting too caught up in spelling, punctuation and grammar.

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You can use any sort of picture – a cartoon, a photo, a piece of classic artwork – to inspire children’s imagination.

‘One of my favourite picture prompts is a photo of a smashed chocolate egg, surrounded by tiny model workmen,’ Julia says.

It’s a common homework task for primary school kids, and a key part of the English National Curriculum, but while some children are overflowing with inspiration, others find it hard to come up with ideas.

That’s where creative writing prompts – any tool that is used to kickstart the writing process, such as a picture, an opening sentence or a piece of music – can come in useful.‘Creative writing prompts can be anything that gets children thinking outside the box,’ explains Julia Skinner, founder of the 100 Word Challenge writing programme and The Head’s Office blog.

Giving them a starter such as, ‘How was the dragon going to tell his father what he had done?

’ can prompt a huge and varied range of storylines, from adventure to comedy to tragedy.‘Giving them something specific and concrete can help them to develop their ideas in ways that they would usually struggle with.’Prompts can help children to come up with a far more diverse set of ideas than they might usually.‘If you give a whole class a set title, you tend to get a very generic response,’ says Julia.A creative writing prompt such as a picture or opening sentence can help to fire this creative process.‘It gives children both the freedom and encouragement to develop their ideas by thinking beyond the obvious and immediate,’ Julia explains.‘Some children find it hard to get going with creative writing, and really benefit from having a more thought-provoking starting point.’Often, children are given a creative writing task based on a set title, such as: ‘Write a story about a dragon’.‘This might not be a problem for a child who has lots of imagination, but it can be a challenge for those who find it difficult to come up with ideas and don’t consider themselves to be very creative,’ says Julia.The key to using a creative writing prompt, says Julia, is to not just put it in front of your child but to spend some time exploring it together before they put pen to paper.‘Creative writing shouldn’t be something where you leave your child to their own devices,’ Julia explains.Bonus features: • Better Word - Enhances writing and vocabulary skills by offering dynamic alternatives to overused words.• Hard to Spell Words - Provides the proper spelling of over 100 commonly misspelled words.

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